The First Step of The Process

The Healthy Business Prevention Program follows a 3 step process as we assess patients to determine their risk for heart disease or stroke.  The program is designed to:

  • Detect arterial disease
  • Identify causes of disease
  • Manage and monitor patient's outcome

Our first step is to detect arterial disease, also known as atherosclerosis.  We use the Carotid IMT, a quick non-invasive test which can be performed in our office or in yours.  The CIMT detects thickening of the arterial wall, a sign of atherosclerosis, which can typically be seen through imaging well before symptoms present themselves.

For a low fixed cost, companies can have us screen their employees to prevent issues before they arise! Companies who take advantage of the Healthy Business Prevention Program benefit from improved productivity and cost-savings for health insurance plans.

To learn more, please visit our website or contact us 

May You Not Have a Stroke

May You Not Have a Stroke

We are finishing “May”, also known as National Stroke Awareness Month.  There are ample sources of information about how to recognize stroke signs and symptoms.  If they are present, getting to a stroke center can save your life or prevent serious long term disability.

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Don’t Wait to Be Labeled a Diabetic

Don’t Wait to Be Labeled a Diabetic

When discussing diabetes with non-medical professionals, it often strikes me how many people have misconceptions about disease, its onset and its symptoms and treatments.  Last May, I was honored (and got to Kiss a Pig!) at the annual American Diabetes Association fund raising gala. The purpose of the contest, in addition to raising funds for the ADA's mission, is to raise awareness of diabetes and prediabetes,

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This year, make an investment in your health!

This year, make an investment in your health!

January is the month of resolutions and commitments. As we set off in this new year, many people embrace the concept that, with the new year, we can make a fresh start, and make commitments to ourselves to make positive changes to our lives.

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From Good Idea to Action

From Good Idea to Action

Everybody has something they find frustrating.  For some it is traffic, for others it might be a service that doesn’t quite meet their needs or expectations. At the top of my list is to see people who have access to things that would make their lives longer and better, but they either ignore those options or choose alternatives that are less effective or even harmful.

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New Rule for Hydrocodone Prescribing

New Rule for Hydrocodone Prescribing

Those of you who take the prescription pain reliever hydrocodone (also prescribed and sold as Norco and Vicodin) are about to have a new experience in obtaining your medication.  If you are taking hydrocodone, it is likely because other alternatives have failed or have unacceptable side effects or risks. 

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Information Technology and Healthcare

Information Technology and Healthcare

This week, my attention has been drawn to information technology.   I just read an article in the AMA News detailing how electronic medical records are distracting physicians from patient care.  I agree – an overhaul is needed. In the past week, the web based Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system I use (which I generally find useful and cost effective

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Lifestyle changes and early identification are key to preventing heart disease

Lifestyle changes and early identification are key to preventing heart disease

he State-Journal Register ran a front page article on August 26th entitled Drugs, technology reduce deaths from heart disease.  I found it interesting that the focus was on care and treatment after an event, rather than on preventative care, and sent the following letter to the editor (published September 1):

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Are Vascular Health Screenings worthwhile?

Are Vascular Health Screenings worthwhile?

 “If you ask the wrong question, you are certain to get the wrong answer.”    In medicine, it’s a little scary to think that professionals may be asking the wrong question, but in some instances, that may be the case. Recent news articles question the value, even the “ethics” of heart screenings, specifically the carotid ultrasound.  Since we perform diagnostic screening in our practice, I thought I would take this opportunity to clarify the difference between what the critics describe, why they don’t think they are useful, and what a truly valuable assessment might look like.

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